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Forum Oi! → Chit-Chat → Who or what was the person or episode in your life inspired you most to serve in military?

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Posts: 21

1




Null, Chapter 1 you asked for!

2

You never fail me, Marine.


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thank you B.H.M...your papa was and still is awesome and a hero..he could have been shot down and killed or tortured..thank god he served all his time without haveing that happen..you and your brother are chips off the hard block.service to america became your goals and you both served with honor and pride..your whole family are heros..even mama..she had nothing but heart ach and stress knowning her men are on the cusp of death...god bless all of you...my papa was a army soldier that went into the o.s.s. and served in europe.in ww2 ..in korea he served again in intelligence ..he was a dark ,quit ,very serious man, that never wanted to talk about his service..but he still motivated me to follow in his footsteps...hes been gone 20 years but i will always miss and love him.

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My own inspiration was having met my veteran father at his funeral, and being handed the tricornered flag with the bullet casings, and also being raised by a clinical psychopath whose mind was destroyed by every male she ever loved being a veteran. I had to have an infant removed from my home by the police, after being attacked by an adult. I took my experience to a recruiter, who told me it was an act of bravery, and he could build on that. I ended up with the Military Police Activity at Ft Benning's USAIC (United States Army Infantry Center).
I had to immediately go from fucked childhood to someone trying to keep the US Rangers under control. Frankly, I'm all fucked up as a result of those experiences. Then they sent me to Panama to overthrow a tyrant. Lots of stories to tell on that sh*t. We kicked a lot of asses.
In fact, OJ, you're one of the few experienced enough to know I"m telling the truth about this. Remember how hard it was to find color pictures of the Invasion of Panama? Remember how the only web photos available for some time were a stack of about 12--one of which was this one? This was MY FKING UNIT! 998TH Military Police Company--when we rolled in to clean up the Rangers mess and exercise absolute f*ck*ng dominance over the PDF FBI station, AKA DENI--down the street from the Commadancia, after storming Modelo prison.
Please tell me you remember Modelo? You could never forget it, it's the one with all the murals of gringos bleeding out.
https://uploads.disquscdn.c...

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Holy crap yo that sounds intense!
Thanks for your service!

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Never went to Panama, but knew some who did.  It was really tough duty, and I have been told that it was really out of control.  Lack of leadership, possibly, and they DIDN'T use the 6P principles.  You know!
Prior.
Planning.
Prevents.
Piss.
Poor.
Performance!
You seem to have done a great job of getting through all the sh*t, and I am proud to call you my Brother in Arms!

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Who said my dad was never shot down?
Korea, 1951, MIG alley.  Dad was returning to base after a combat mission, coming in on final approach.  Whether his aircraft, an F-86D, was hit by another enemy aircraft, or some slob who had sneaked up on the the end of the runway with a rifle was never determined, but at about 100 feet up, on final approach, the hydraulics let go, and the jet engine basically disintegrated.  The F-86 had a 1-400 ratio stick to control surfaces.  It reverses when there are no hydraulics.  But he had the wing gear down, nose gear was stuck up, no power anywhere, and the glide characteristics of a rock, and Zero-Zero ejection seats did not exist.
There was a Benjo (open sewer) at the end of the runway.  (I have used the Japanese word, have no idea what Koreans call it).  He had come down enough so that the wing gear hit the side of the ditch by the runway and snapped off, and he slammed onto the runway with a belly landing.  The wings didn't last long, and the aircraft started to roll, and the fuselage broke off just behind the canopy.  That section rolled to a stop eventually, and my dad said he was still OK at this time.  But, the cockpit was parallel to the runway, instead of perpendicular, sitting in an upright position.  Said he was wondering how he would get out, because the canopy had not broken, when all of a sudden, the less than reliable ejection seats on those planes ignited, and put him through the canopy, where he landed 75 yards later on the tarmac, face down, with 300 pound of ejection seat still strapped to his ass.
He spent the next 32 days in a coma, during which he was medivaced to Nellis AFB in Nevada, from Korea.  He was not expected to live, but he woke up, madder than Hell for some reason, but the crisis got better after that.  He spent 1 year in the hospital, with NO chance to get away.  For the next year, he was allowed day passes for about 6 months, then overnight passes about once a month.  After he was finally discharged from the hospital, he was returned to active duty, and his first day back, he crawled into an F-86D, and went to bore holes in the sky.
Toughest man I ever knew.

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Great story, Marine!

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Thanks, Jed.  If you see Guffie around, he is creating new profiles by the dozen, it appears, just so that POS can troll me, give me or Null a shout.

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Aye, aye.

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That's quite a story that you had shared with all of us about your father. Please preserve those cherished memories of him from generation to generation. Especially through close friends and family, etc.
I would say that you have set the bar pretty darn high as for as one's ultimate hero in life is concerned that's for sure, lol.  Thanks for sharing that amazing story about your father. You should be extremely proud to call him your very own TRUE HERO.

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I always have been proud of him!  And he cast a GIANT shadow.  Thanks for the kind words Tim.

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I originally joined for the college money after graduating high school, I never even considered joining during anytime during high school. But I still had reverence for my grandfathers service. Him and my father were Army, WWII and Vietnam. My grandfathers been dead for 20 years, and I don't know all of the details of his service(he refused to talk about it), I may never know them all. I do know he endured a lot in WWII. From what I've been told from those he would speak with, he was second wave at Omaha on D-Day, he was a tanker and his tank was destroyed within minutes on the beach. I remember seeing shrapnel/burn marks on his back as a child. He obviously survived d-day, and went on to see a whole slew of horrific sh*t. I have a German bayonet that he took off a German soldier and killed him with it. When he gave it to me, it was still covered in 50 year old German blood. I don't know much else, it would be nice to know his whole story. I don't even know unit names, or anything really. I don't know much about my fathers service either, I know he was in 1st Cav, as a Cobra crew chief, did a couple years and came home. He's dead now too, not likely to find many answers about either's service.

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An amazing story of heroism and unbreakable will to survive. Your dad must have been indeed a very special man. Thank you for sharing it with us, Sir.

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An amazing story of heroism and unbreakable will to survive. Your dad must have been indeed a very special man. Thank you for sharing it with us, Sir.

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My grandfather. 1939 - 1945. Chased by German tanks on the Belgium border. Rescued at Dunkirk. Fought in Africa, Italy. Always very blasé about the whole thing. Have all his medals, certificates, badges etc. Passed away from cancer aged 80

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My grandfather. 1939 - 1945. Chased by German tanks on the Belgium border. Rescued at Dunkirk. Fought in Africa, Italy. Always very blasé about the whole thing. Have all his medals, certificates, badges etc. Passed away from cancer aged 80


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Not a vet, but my father was my inspiration to be a Michigan State Police officer. He was the strongest man I've ever known. He  lied about his age to go to war and was sent to Guadalcanal. His parents immigrated to this country before my father was born in Victoria Texas. They ended up in Detroit, where he was shot on two separate instances. Once in a party store robbery and once in his own bar down in Mexican town. He fought for his country, grew up through the depression and still managed to raise 12 children. He was 52 when I was born and I was only 26 when I lost him. He was a hard man and set a high bar that I always tried to reach. Id like to think I did. I became a deputy first and he made it clear that if I wanted to be the best that I should have gone to the state. So I did and I saw my dad cry and smile while he pinned badge on me. The MSP handed out the military "Espirit De Corp" and it was everything I was ever taught at home by Dad. I never got the chance to tell him how proud I was of him, but I always hoped my life path would show him.

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Holy CRAP, that's hysterical!!  What a maROON.  The cattle prod on the metal gate had me rolling.

20

very well said..thank you Null

21

Thanks. It helps that my hangover's all but gone. I'm really enjoying my brain and body clearing up finally. lol

Posts: 21

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Forum Oi! → Chit-Chat → Who or what was the person or episode in your life inspired you most to serve in military?

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