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Forum Oi! → Chit-Chat → Can Human Rights Be Justified Philosophically? If Not, Then What Are The Consequences?

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perhaps a consequence is the establishment as fact, that philosophy isnt actually that important after all?
backs out of the room.

2

I think basarov's post makes worthwhile points. Sartrean authenticity, which seems to dovetail with Levinas's and Buber's founding of dignity and rights not in ourselves (egos) but instead in the Other(s), has dual benefits of guaranteeing individual human rights in the outcome, and rights socially understood. As I've written in other posts, I also want to bring in Sartre's later ethical commitments to need and scarcity in sociopolitical contexts. To get back to the topic of ontology again, we need to recognize our being is both social and individual. A third benefit of anchoring rights in the Other(s) is that they don't seem insurmountably difficult to extend, especially in Levinas, to the biosphere or perhaps some even larger love and honoring of the universe. Another route, which could come close to saying the same as Levinas and Buber but from a different starting point (I'll take a rain check on that question), is a virtues and vices formulation.

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Forum Oi! → Chit-Chat → Can Human Rights Be Justified Philosophically? If Not, Then What Are The Consequences?

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